Bestsellers of the 70s – A Return to the Roots

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The roaring sixties was a turbulent period of changes which brought about the cultural revolution, and with it new perspectives on numerous social issues which weren’t widely acknowledged until then. While part of the afore-mentioned revolution did carry over into the following decade, its power was waning in the realm of literature at the start of the 1970s.

While certain key topics such as racism remained at the forefront of people’s minds, they were less and less receptive to the heavy social criticism bestsellers of the previous decade painted all fronts of society with. With the concurrent rise of the cheaper paperback medium as well as the popularity of “genre fiction”, a new wave rose to the surface.

Particularly, non-fiction crime books really began to draw the interest the people, and we even saw the emergence of the horror genre, the popularity of which requires no elaboration in the present day. Evidently, people found themselves drawn to learn about the darker side of human nature, perhaps a consequence of last decade’s literature.

Some of the bestsellers of the 70s include Jailbird by Kurt Vonnegut, Sophie’s Choice by William Styron, The Shining by Stephen King, Ragtime by E.L. Doctorow, Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy by John le Carré and Scruples by Judith Krantz.

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“Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance” by Robert Maynard Pirsig – The Fundamental Odyssey

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“Ragtime” by E.L. Doctorow – The Recurring Patterns in Life

E.L. Doctorow is revered as one of the greatest and most influential authors of the 20th century, and I think anyone who picks up his works, whether they like them or not, can understand why.

Ragtime was considered one of his best works and a true classic, presenting a relatively disjointed narrative following many characters, some real and others imagined, across their trials and tribulations in a snapshot of early 1900s New York City.

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“Coma” by Robin Cook – The Hospital without Recovery

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Following a third-year medical student, we follow her investigation into the Boston Memorial Hospital, where people seem to be dropping into comas on the operating table at a suspiciously higher rate than usual.

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