Bestsellers – The books chosen by Th People.

Bestsellers Page Header image

If one wants to understand humanity over the course of any period in its civilized history, I believe the best place to start is by examining the literature of the epoch. Our writings, both fictional and real, have always mirrored the hopes and concerns permeating in society at any given point.

Needless to say, there are far too many books for us to be able to read, especially with how limited free time is these days. Thankfully, we’ve largely been able to rely on public opinion to determine which books are worth our time, even if it does leave a few diamonds in the rough behind.

The bestsellers of any given decade, or even century, aren’t simply the books which sold the most copies. They are the works which resonated the most with The People at large, representing aspects of their inner worlds and societies better than anyone else could. While they’re definitely not the sole books worth reading, they’ve definitely earned a special in the pantheon of literature.

In this category you’ll find some of the bestselling books arranged by the decades they were released in. For those looking to explore the minds of people in the last few decades through their literature, there is no better place to start.

Bestsellers of the 70s

“Jonathan Livingston Seagull” by Richard Bach – The Dormant Explorer Within

Richard Bach is one of the few authors whose works continue to stand the test of time, with his classic Jonathan Livingston Seagull still being as current as back when it was written. A tale of inspiration, it follows the titular seagull as he learns the art of flight and finds his own way through life, despite his peers’ lack of approval.

Continue Reading “Jonathan Livingston Seagull” by Richard Bach – The Dormant Explorer Within

“Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance” by Robert Maynard Pirsig – The Fundamental Odyssey

Robert Maynard Pirsig was recognized numerous times as a unique and exceptional author for the depth of reflection found in his unusual books. Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance was arguably his greatest work, telling a largely autobiographical story of a road trip he took with his son, learning quite a bit about life in the process.

Continue Reading “Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance” by Robert Maynard Pirsig – The Fundamental Odyssey

“Ragtime” by E.L. Doctorow – The Recurring Patterns in Life

E.L. Doctorow is revered as one of the greatest and most influential authors of the 20th century, and I think anyone who picks up his works, whether they like them or not, can understand why.

Ragtime was considered one of his best works and a true classic, presenting a relatively disjointed narrative following many characters, some real and others imagined, across their trials and tribulations in a snapshot of early 1900s New York City.

Continue Reading “Ragtime” by E.L. Doctorow – The Recurring Patterns in Life

“Coma” by Robin Cook – The Hospital without Recovery

It’s hard to believe it has already been over forty years since Robin Cook introduced the concept of medical thrillers to the world in true style, by penning his classic novel Coma which still holds up to this very day.

Following a third-year medical student, we follow her investigation into the Boston Memorial Hospital, where people seem to be dropping into comas on the operating table at a suspiciously higher rate than usual.

Continue Reading “Coma” by Robin Cook – The Hospital without Recovery


Bestsellers of the 60s

“The Sirens of Titan” by Kurt Vonnegut – The Inescapable Plan

Kurt Vonnegut has many novels through which he established his lifelong fame as an essential author of the 20th century, and the first of those was titled The Sirens of Titan. Published all the way back in 1959, it tells the story of Malachi Constant, Earth’s richest and most depraved man, as he embarks on a grand interplanetary voyage against his own will, learning much about the universe in the process, and forgetting even more about himself.

Continue Reading “The Sirens of Titan” by Kurt Vonnegut – The Inescapable Plan

“Solaris” by Stanislaw Lem – The Unnoticed Contact

Lem has left an indelible mark on the world of both literature and cinema when he published Solaris back in 1961. It tells the story of a psychologist, Kris Kelvin, sent on a mission to a distant space station for the purpose of studying an ocean which, so far, has managed to defy all scientific explanation. However, when he arrives the situation on the station seems strangely dire, and soon an unexpected visitor appears from thin air.

Continue Reading “Solaris” by Stanislaw Lem – The Unnoticed Contact

“Catch-22” by Joseph Heller – Where Rational Thought goes to Die

Joseph Heller forever gifted humanity a slightly deeper understanding of human nature and the utter folly pervasive in war when he published the eternally-current Catch-22. The novel, drawing in part on Heller’s experiences as a bombardier, follows the story of Captain John Yossarian and his mates who experience the incongruous insanity of the Second World War as they fly their missions over Italy.

Continue Reading “Catch-22” by Joseph Heller – Where Rational Thought goes to Die

“A Small Town in Germany” by John le Carre – Upsetting all the Right People

John le Carre understood like few others the ins and outs of espionage, having personally stewed in it for a number of years. In A Small Town in Germany, perhaps one of the lesser-known novels in comparison to his famous ones, tells the story of a hunt for an embassy worker, Leo Harting, who goes missing with a briefcase stuffed with confidential documents.

Continue Reading “A Small Town in Germany” by John le Carre – Upsetting all the Right People

“The Day of the Jackal” by Frederick Forsyth – The Pinnacle of Professional Killing

Frederick Forsyth might have very well written one of the absolute best criminal espionage novels when he published The Day of the Jackal back in 1971.

Following a nameless English hitman known only as The Jackal, the story focuses on his methodical preparation to carry out what might be the most ambitious assassination of all time: killing Charles de Gaulle.

Continue Reading “The Day of the Jackal” by Frederick Forsyth – The Pinnacle of Professional Killing

“One Hundred Years of Solitude” by Gabriel Garcia Marquez – Time is Indeed a Circle

Gabriel Garcia Marquez, winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1982, is a figure who needs little introduction among book lovers.

His works have always been distinguished by their profound and meaningful nature, and One Hundred Years of Solitude represents those qualities like none other.

Telling of the rise and fall of a mythical town called Macondo, the story follows the lives of multiple generations belonging to the Buendia family.

Continue Reading “One Hundred Years of Solitude” by Gabriel Garcia Marquez – Time is Indeed a Circle

“The Source” by James A. Michener – The Holy Land Madhouse

James A. Michener had a rather peculiar specialty as an author, focusing on rather lengthy historical novels profoundly focusing on a specific geographical location.

The Source, originally published back in 1965, takes us on a journey thousands of years long through the Holy Land, recounting the origins of Judaism, the rise of the early Hebrews, and all which happened since then until the modern conflict with Palestine.

Continue Reading “The Source” by James A. Michener – The Holy Land Madhouse

“The Agony and the Ecstasy” by Irving Stone – The Grasp for Heaven

Irving Stone had a knack like none other for writing poignant biographical novels which still remained true to their sources, with The Agony and the Ecstasy arguably being his most famous and defining work.

Fictionalizing the life of Michelangelo Buonarroti, the all-time famous artist responsible for many immortal creations, the novel takes us on a grandiose and perilous journey through the Renaissance as the artist tries to find his way in life against all odds.

Continue Reading “The Agony and the Ecstasy” by Irving Stone – The Grasp for Heaven

“The Spy Who Came in from the Cold” by John le Carre – A Warzone for Intellectuals

John Le Carre is a man whom I believe needs little introduction at this stage, having authored so many international bestsellers, some of which found their way on our television and movie screens.

Already fifty years have passed since he published his first bestselling novel, the one to really launch his career, The Spy Who Came in from the Cold.

Continue Reading “The Spy Who Came in from the Cold” by John le Carre – A Warzone for Intellectuals

“In Cold Blood” by Truman Capote – Reconstruct the American Tragedy

Truman Capote may very well have revolutionized the world of journalism when he wrote the novelized yet non-fictional account of the Clutter family murder, but more than that, he created one of the most powerful and compelling true crime narrations that takes us into the emotional and psychological depths of the American tragedy.

Praised by one side and criticized by the other, In Cold Blood remains a rather controversial book to this very day, one that is nevertheless deemed an important milestone in American literature.

Continue Reading “In Cold Blood” by Truman Capote – Reconstruct the American Tragedy